Lynchcombe Steps

Hawthorm in Bloom - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID IMG_1581

Hawthorm in Bloom – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID IMG_1581

Lynchcombe Nature Reserve

During spring the volunteering activities organised by the Somerset Wildlife Trust closed down as the country tackled the pandemic.  Then in May things started to very slowly return to normal.  Now we were allowed outside for more than just shopping and exercise.  Lynchcombe is just up the hill from my home and it became the perfect location to get away from the problems of the world.  Hardly anyone visits the nature reserve so perfect for social distancing.

I took the opportunity of these quiet times to try and learn how to identify some flies and beetles.  That was quite a task, and I did not get very far.  Hoverflies quickly became my favourites.

Glass-winged Syrphus (Syrphus vitripennis) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_1668

Glass-winged Syrphus (Syrphus vitripennis) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_1668

There are so many flies, and I was bitten by most of the them.

Common green bottle fly (Lucilia sericata) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_0398

Common green bottle fly (Lucilia sericata) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_0398

Beetles are more of a challenge.  There is simply too many different species.

Sailor Beetle (Cantharis rustica) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK> ID JB1_0034

Sailor Beetle (Cantharis rustica) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK> ID JB1_0034

Thousands of different types of click beetles alone.

Male Click beetle (Ctenicera pectinicornis) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_3351

Male Click beetle (Ctenicera pectinicornis) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_3351

Swollen-thighed beetles were everywhere on Lynchcombe.  Each buttercup and dog rose seemed to have its own resident.

Swollen-thighed beetle (Oedemera nobilis) on Buttercup - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2014

Swollen-thighed beetle (Oedemera nobilis) on Buttercup – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2014

The beetles seemed happy to make friends with the skippers.  Let’s face it, skippers are pretty friendly butterflies.

Large Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanus) and Swollen-thighed Beetle (Oedemera nobilis) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_3235

Large Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanus) and Swollen-thighed Beetle (Oedemera nobilis) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_3235

The speckled woods were about in the combe as normal.

Speckled wood (Pararge aegeria) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID IJB1_2629

Speckled wood (Pararge aegeria) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID IJB1_2629

At the top of the reserve small heaths settled in the long grass before doing the leaning over thing.

Small Heath (Coenonympha pamphilus) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_0006

Small Heath (Coenonympha pamphilus) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_0006

This mother shipton moth seemed content to the suck up the salts from a patch of dung.

Mother Shipton (Callistege mi) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2760

Mother Shipton (Callistege mi) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2760

This was also a good year for the first batch of common blues.

Common Blue (Polyommatus icarus) - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2170

Common Blue (Polyommatus icarus) – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2170

The sloe berries started to appear very early.

New Sloes - Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2610

New Sloes – Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2610

And finally…

The insects provide the details, but the big picture comes when you look up and enjoy panoramic views.

View from Lynchcombe - Mendip Hills, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_3316

View from Lynchcombe – Mendip Hills, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_3316

The classic image of Glastonbury Tor in the Somerset countryside.

Glastonbury Tor - From Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2859

Glastonbury Tor – From Lynchcombe, Somerset, UK. ID JB1_2859

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